3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12previous Page - vorherige Seitenext Page - naechste Seite
Date
Title
Size
18.06.2015
Industry 4.0: China seizes an outstanding opportunity in the “Year of Innovation”
Abstract: Industry 4.0 (also known as integrated industry, industrial internet) is currently the subject of intense debate. This megatrend sets out to change the way goods and services are created and distributed, reshaping the industrial landscape on a national and global scale. China intends to play a leading role in this digital evolution. A wide range of policies have been initiated and sizeable progress in various areas has been made. The country is determined to seize the outstanding opportunity at hand, as the recently unveiled “Made in China 2025” plan underlines. China still has a long road ahead. However, with its new plan it combines a long-term vision with concrete actions in the proclaimed “Year of Innovation”.
Topics: Auto industry; Economic structure; Electrical engineering; EMU; Germany; Globalisation; Information technology; Innovation; Intern. relations; Key issues - nicht mehr verwenden!; Mechanical engineering; Real econ. trends; Sectors / commodities; Social values / Consumer behaviour; Technology and innovation; Telecommunication; Trade
load Pdf 
01.06.2015
Focus Germany: Lower GDP forecast – but domestic demand alive and kicking
Abstract: The Q1 GDP details provide some comfort relative to the disappointing 0.3% qoq headline number. Final domestic demand was up 0.8% qoq while net-exports as well as inventories both provided a drag. Thus, our 2015 story of GDP growth driven by strong domestic demand remains intact. Despite this, we lower our 2015 GDP forecast from 2.0% to 1.6%. This is primarily due to the weaker-than-expected Q1 GDP growth that provides a lower starting base for 2015. However, we still expect quarterly growth rates to average a healthy 0.4% qoq in 2015. Further topics in this issue: Construction investment: Sharp increase expected, but focus on downside risks, The view from Berlin. German politics: Quarrel among friends and families.
Topics: Business cycle; Commercial real estate; Economic growth; Germany; Housing policy; Key issues - nicht mehr verwenden!; Macroeconomics; Politics and elections; Prices, inflation; Real estate; Residential real estate
load Pdf 1441k 
28.05.2015
Misguided policy raises risk of housing bubble
Abstract: Politicians should focus on an expansion of building activity in the major cities and conurbations in order to reduce the upside pressure on house prices. In the past few months there have been indications of easing activity in the construction sector. If this trend materialises, the pressure on house prices will intensify further. One possible cause of this development is capacity restrictions, and a lack of suitable skilled labour in the finishing trades in particular. An immigration law that specifically focuses on bottlenecks in the labour market could help to bring about some relief. If it becomes obvious over the next few months that construction growth is going to remain sluggish long term, rent control should not be implemented in the regions.
Topics: Cities; Construction industry; Demographics; Germany; Housing policy; Key issues - nicht mehr verwenden!; Real estate; Residential real estate
load Pdf 680k 
27.05.2015
German steel set to benefit from global growth
Abstract: The period up to 2025 offers the German steel industry good prospects for a stable and economically sound future. However, this requires policymakers to take a reasonable approach to the further development of the regulatory framework for steel producers and their customer industries in Germany just as it requires only a modest level of expansion in steel capacity at global level. There are also other conceivable scenarios with greater risks, challenges and consequences for the German steel industry and its employees – and these alternatives are in no way completely improbable.
Topics: Auto industry; Construction industry; Energy policy; Germany; Globalisation; Innovation; Key issues - nicht mehr verwenden!; Mechanical engineering; Sectors / commodities; Steel industry; Trade
load Pdf 560k 
26.05.2015
How is the weak euro affecting different sectors? Who is benefiting and who is losing out?
Abstract: At sectoral level, the positive effects of the euro's current weakness are clearly outweighing its drawbacks. Capital equipment manufacturers are benefiting the most from the increasing price competitiveness offered by Germany as a business location. In 2014, the automotive industry generated 45.5% of its total revenue from non-EMU countries, while the proportion for the mechanical engineering sector was almost 43%. Parts of the electrical engineering, chemicals and pharmaceutical industries are also especially benefiting from the recent devaluation in the euro.
Topics: Auto industry; Business cycle; Chemicals industry; Electrical engineering; Emerging markets; Exchange rates; Food and beverages; Germany; Globalisation; Key issues - nicht mehr verwenden!; Mechanical engineering; Other sectors; Sectors / commodities; Steel industry; Telecommunication; Textiles and clothing industry; Trade
load Pdf 735k 
19.05.2015
Media sector reinventing itself: Music shrinking, books stabilising, film booming
Topics: E-commerce; Economic structure; Economic trends; Germany; Information technology; Innovation; Internet; Media/PR & Advertising; Other sectors; Sectors / commodities; Services; Social values / Consumer behaviour; Technology and innovation; Telecommunication
load Pdf 
11.05.2015
German industry: Only marginal increase in output at start of 2015
Abstract: Despite only marginally higher output in Germany's manufacturing sector in Q1 2015 we are sticking with our full-year production forecast (+1.5% in real terms). The current softness of the euro benefits Germany's export sectors. Nonetheless, companies appear much more upbeat in their assessment of the current situation than in their expectations for the coming months. This is likely due, for example, to continuing geopolitical risks and poorer economic policy conditions in Germany. So it is clear that in the business world not everything is sweetness and light.
Topics: Auto industry; Business cycle; Chemicals industry; Economic growth; Electrical engineering; Germany; Key issues - nicht mehr verwenden!; Macroeconomics; Mechanical engineering; Other sectors; Sectors / commodities; Steel industry
load Pdf 
08.05.2015
No all-clear signal from demographics
Abstract: The latest population projections by Germany's Federal Statistical Office once again highlight the Herculean task of coping with demographic change. Once immigration begins to fall from its current temporary high, the fair weather in the labour market caused by rising employment figures may already turn cloudy within the next ten years. Consistent political action in the fields of old-age provision and long-term care is required given rising life expectancy and the expected doubling of the number of the very elderly.
Topics: Economic policy; Germany; Key issues - nicht mehr verwenden!
load Pdf 
30.04.2015
Focus Germany: German savers challenged by QE
Abstract: The financial situation of German households continued to improve markedly in 2014. The good income situation enabled them to make new investments to the tune of EUR 160 bn. In addition, the valuation gains on existing financial assets came to EUR 53 bn. Overall, total gross household financial assets thus increased from EUR 5 tr to EUR 5.2 tr (180% of GDP). Nothing has fundamentally changed with regard to the minimal risk appetite of German investors; risk-bearing investments still constitute less than 25% of financial assets. However, their share of new investments climbed to 11%. Furthermore, in 2014 EUR 20.5 bn of new debt was taken on. Both developments have probably been heavily influenced by the low-interest rate environment and are likely to continue in 2015 given the monetary policy outlook.
Topics: Business cycle; Economic growth; Germany; Key issues - nicht mehr verwenden!; Macroeconomics; Politics and elections; Real econ. trends; Social values / Consumer behaviour
load Pdf 1440k 
17.04.2015
Minimum wage: First negative effects become visible
Abstract: Roughly 100 days have passed since the introduction of the minimum wage, and the Minister of Labour Andrea Nahles is already calling it a success story. However, we would urge caution given the considerable time lags with the effects of the minimum wage of EUR 8.50 per hour. In the medium term, we continue to expect clearly negative effects on employment and a missing of the targets of a more just income distribution and fiscal relief. In the medium term, we still expect a negative employment effect of 800,000 persons in line with our ex-ante study "Minimum wage of EUR 8.50 per hour: Grand Coalition on the wrong track".
Topics: Business cycle; Germany; Labour market; Labour market policy
load Pdf 
3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12previous Page - vorherige Seitenext Page - naechste Seite
 
Germany
06.04.2017
Public investments, German housing market, Corpoorate bonds, Saarland election results
09.03.2017
GDP forecast, inflation forecast; German industry, German election campaign
 
Bundestagswahl 2017
Brexit
Interactive maps
Copyright © 2017 Deutsche Bank AG, Frankfurt am Main