Focus topic European Integration

Focus topic: European integrationEU integration greatly influences policy-making at the national level, and the EU itself is a major actor on the world economic stage. Most of the conditions governing the economic and business environment for European companies and consumers - especially in respect of the financial markets - are decided at the European level. For this reason, DB Research regularly analyses and appraises the latest developments in the EU and EMU, including issues relating to enlargement, European banks and financial markets.

 

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23.03.2017
Who is afraid of populists?
Abstract: With developments in the UK and the US, populism was a key theme in 2016. But does the perception of 2016 as “the year of the populists” really fit for Europe? A closer look suggests that while populism was an omnipresent theme in public discourse, support for populist parties in polls rather remained stable and elections did not translate into outright populist wins. The rise of populist parties has however been a multi-year trend. Populists can affect national politics in various ways. One possible effect is that forming a government (coalition) often gets more complicated and time-consuming and results in more fragile governments. Another is populists’ potential impact on policy discussions’ style and content. Pursuing policies with long-term benefits but which are often not instantly popular becomes more difficult ‒ both at the national and the European level.
Topics: Brexit; Economic policy; European integration; European issues; European policy issues; Politics and elections
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24.01.2017
Coping with mixed feelings: What future for European trade policy?
Abstract: It is hard to overstate the importance of trade policy for Europe. The EU28 is the largest trading bloc, the top trading partner for about 80 countries worldwide and ranks 1st for in- and outbound investment. The EU’s free trade agreements (FTAs) vary substantially, depending on partners and policy priorities. “New generation trade agreements” go beyond traditional tariff reductions, including issues like services trade, intellectual property or investment. EU agreements to foster trade (and investment), however, have sparked mixed feelings more recently given the backlash against globalisation as well as EU-internal controversies over the power to strike such deals. Yet, the EU’s ability to conclude trade deals is also contingent on political support. Rising scepticism about globalisation means, that (potential) distributional effects of FTAs and their (potential) interaction with national legislation, is going to feature more prominently throughout negotiations and in the public debate.
Topics: Brexit; Economic policy; EMU; European integration; European issues; European policy issues; Globalisation; Intern. relations; Trade
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02.11.2016
Youth unemployment in the EU: Are we improving?
Abstract: The European Commission proposed to increase the funds for fighting youth unemployment as part of the mid-term review of the EU budget. How to evaluate this idea in the light of the current labour market situation for young people in Europe?
Topics: European integration; European issues; European policy issues; Labour market; Labour market policy
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30.09.2016
Think Local: What Brexit would mean for regional and cohesion policies in Europe
Abstract: Brexit affects regional policy both in the UK and in the EU27. It has a direct impact via financial adjustments for the individual funds, and indirect effects, possibly influencing the budgetary debates to come and adjusting regional policy priorities. However, the effects are highly contingent on the timing of Brexit and the planning processes and preparations for the new EU budget beyond 2020. The biggest stakes are potential changes to the structural funds which invest all across the EU. Finally, there is the issue of possible future cooperation between the EU27 and the UK after a Brexit. In principle, regional policy programmes already provide for some options here. However, the specific arrangements and conditions are only going to be defined as part of the negotiations to structure the new relationship.
Topics: Brexit; Economic policy; European integration; European issues; Fiscal policy; Key issues - nicht mehr verwenden!
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29.08.2016
The industrial sector's share in the EU economy is stabilising
Abstract: Nearly four years ago, the European Commission set its sights on increasing the share of manufacturing in total gross value added from 15.5% at that time to 20% by 2020. This target will probably not be met. After all, in 2015 the share of manufacturing was only around 15.6% and thus scarcely higher than in 2012. However, industry's contribution to EU output has at least stopped decreasing since 2012. Furthermore, industrial gross value added has picked up (slightly) in the EU in recent years in both nominal and real terms. In a few member states, there have been highly contrasting developments in the significance of manufacturing in the economy. It is striking that the industry share in the three large Eastern Europe member states has increased sharply since 2012. Spain and Italy have reported modest gains. Germany has seen its industry share decline slightly in 2015; however, at 22.8% it still far outstrips the EU average.
Topics: Economic policy; Economic trends; European integration; European issues; Key issues - nicht mehr verwenden!; Macroeconomics; Real econ. trends; Sectors / commodities
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26.08.2016
EU budget: Who's to pay for Brexit?
Abstract: Brexit means that the EU is going to lose one of the largest contributors to its budget. The UK paid in a total of EUR 15.1 bn in the first two years of the current budget period 2014-2020, second only to Germany. This is a pattern similar to the previous budget period 2007-2013.
Topics: Brexit; Economic policy; European integration; Fiscal policy
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05.08.2016
EU Regional Policy: Changes after Brexit?
Abstract: The mid-term review of the EU’s multiannual financial framework 2014-2020 is scheduled for the end of 2016. The scenario of a Brexit taking effect in the upcoming years and the potential impact thereof might well be discussed as part of the review. However, given current uncertainties about timing and circumstances of the UK leaving the European Union, it is still too early to fully adapt accounts. Yet, two things seem certain for the time being: First, a Brexit taking effect during the second half of the budgetary planning period would certainly prompt the need for further adjustments. Second, it would also affect funding for regional and cohesion policy as one of the largest EU budgetary items.
Topics: Brexit; Economic policy; European integration; European issues; Key issues - nicht mehr verwenden!
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02.08.2016
Brexit and the EU investment plan: Where do we go from here?
Abstract: Is Brexit going to impact on the EU investment plan? The short answer is „yes“. But the more interesting question is how it is going to play out both on the day-to-day operations, progress with the plan and the future of the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI) in particular.
Topics: Brexit; Capital markets policy; Economic policy; EMU; European integration; European issues; European policy issues
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07.07.2016
A European "generation gap"?
Abstract: One of the widely discussed patterns of the UK-referendum vote is its demographic distribution. Some surveys find that voters older than 65 were more than twice as likely to have opted for “leave” than those younger than 25 years. Demographic differences with respect to perceptions of Europe are not unique to the UK.
Topics: Brexit; Economic policy; European integration
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01.07.2016
Brexit: German automotive and pharmaceutical industries hit the hardest
Abstract: Following the UK referendum, Brexit will also leave traces on German industry. After all, 7.5% of all German exports went to the UK in 2015, making it Germany’s third most important export market after the United States and France. The automotive and pharmaceutical industries are likely to be hit the hardest by Brexit. This is because the UK accounts for 12.8% and 10.5%, respectively, of these two industries’ total exports. In addition, they both generally have an above-average export ratio. The UK referendum is likely to have an impact on individual companies’ investment decisions and German companies’ UK pricing structures in the short term.
Topics: Auto industry; Business cycle; Chemicals industry; Economic growth; Economic policy; Economic trends; Electrical engineering; European integration; European issues; European policy issues; Food and beverages; Globalisation; Intern. economic system; Intern. relations; Key issues - nicht mehr verwenden!; Macroeconomics; Other sectors; Real econ. trends; Sectors / commodities; Socio-econ. trends; Steel industry; Trade
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